Florian Büther


University of Lübeck
Institute of Telematics
Ratzeburger Allee 160

23562 Lübeck
Gebäude 64, 2nd Floor, Raum 60

Email:buether(at)itm.uni-luebeck.de
Phone:+49 451 3101 6408
Fax:+49 451 3101 6404

 

Since October 2015, I am working as research assistant at the Institute of Telematics of Prof. Dr. Stefan Fischer.

Research

I am a member of the Nano Computation and Networking Group. I research models for nanoscale devices and nano computation, as well as methods of data dissemination in medical nanonetworks. I focus on networks with devices that do not have a (unique) identifier, and how to route messages in these networks.

Publications

2018

  • Regine Geyer and Marc Stelzner and Florian Büther and Sebastian Ebers: BloodVoyagerS - Simulation of the work environment of medical nanobots. in 5th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2018 (ACM NanoCom`18), Reykjavik, Iceland, Sep, 2018
    BibTeX
    @INPROCEEDINGS{Geyer2018BloodVoyagerS,
    AUTHOR={Regine Geyer and Marc Stelzner and Florian {B{\"u}ther} and Sebastian Ebers},
    TITLE={{BloodVoyagerS} - Simulation of the work environment of medical nanobots},
    BOOKTITLE={5th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2018 (ACM NanoCom'18)},
    ADDRESS={Reykjavik, Iceland},
    YEAR={2018},
    MONTH={Sep},
    DAYS={5},
    PAGES={},
    ISBN={},
    KEYWORDS={Nanonetworks; Simulation; Medical Application; Nano medicine},
    ABSTRACT={The simulation of nanobots in their working environment is crucial to
    promote their application in the medical context. Several simulators for
    nanonetworks investigate new communication paradigms at nanoscale. However,
    the influence of the environment, namely the human body, on the movement
    and communication of nanobots was not considered so far. We propose a
    framework for simulating medical nanonetworks, which integrates a
    nanonetwork simulator with a body simulator. We derive requirements for a
    body model that forms the basis for our prototypical implementation of the
    body simulator BloodVoyagerSas part of the network simulator ns-3. An
    evaluation shows that BloodVoyagerS successfully moves nanobots in the
    simulated cardiovascular system. After about 7 minutes, the nanobot
    distribution reaches a dynamic equilibrium. The prototype shows promise to
    provide a more realistic full-body simulation to investigate movement and
    communication of nanobots in medical applications.}
    }
  • Florian Büther and Immo Traupe and Sebastian Ebers: Hop Count Routing: A Routing Algorithm for Resource Constrained, Identity-Free Medical Nanonetworks. in 5th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2018 (ACM NanoCom`18), Reykjavik, Iceland, Sep, 2018
    BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Buether2018Hop,
      author={Florian {B{\"u}ther} and Immo Traupe and Sebastian Ebers},
      title={Hop Count Routing: A Routing Algorithm for Resource Constrained, {Identity-Free} Medical Nanonetworks},
      booktitle={5th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2018 (ACM NanoCom'18)},
      address={Reykjavik, Iceland},
      year={2018},
      month={Sep},
      days={5},
      numpages={6},
      doi={10.1145/3233188.3233193},
      isbn={978-1-4503-5711-1/18/09},
      keywords={Routing; Nanonetworks; Algorithm; Hop Count; Identity-Free},
      abstract={Nanodevices, tiny robots operating within a human body, may help to detect and treat many kinds of diseases. As their individual abilities are limited by size, they need to work in concert. Communication provides the fundamental ability to enable this collaboration. In medicine, nanodevices act as a tool for a physician to report sensor data and receive action commands. Their communication thus flows to and from a gateway to the macro world. Routing algorithms focus on enabling these data streams. We propose a new routing algorithm for medical nanonetworks based on a network topology constructed from the hop count distance to a singular gateway. It exploits the distance as a direction indicator to deliver data towards or away from the gateway. The resource constrained nanodevices store no unique identity, but only require a single integer each. Simulation results show that a naive implementation produces exponentially many messages. We mitigate this with a second approach by removing the hop count when retrieving sensor data, which requires only a linear number of messages. Our comparison finds the latter to be more efficient in terms of transmitted messages, while the first implementation is more suitable for routing several messages in parallel.}
    }

2017

  • Florian Lau and Florian Büther and Bennet Gerlach: Computational Requirements for Nano-Machines: There is Limited Space at the Bottom. in 4th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2017 (ACM NanoCom`17), pp. 11:1-11:6, ACM, Washington DC, USA, August, 2017
    BibTeX
    @inproceedings{Lau2017Computational,
    author={Florian Lau and Florian Büther and Bennet Gerlach},
    title={Computational Requirements for {Nano-Machines:} There is Limited Space at the Bottom},
    booktitle={4th ACM International Conference on Nanoscale Computing and Communication 2017 (ACM NanoCom'17)},
    address={Washington DC, USA},
    year={2017},
    days={27},
    month={August},
    pages={11:1--11:6},
    publisher={ACM},
    doi={10.1145/3109453.3109458},
    keywords={Nanonetworks; Computational Complexity; Space-Complexity;Nano-Machines},
    abstract={Akyildiz et al. envisioned the use of nanonetworks as a new paradigm for computation on a very small scale. Since then, many scientists researched dependent aspects like nanoscale communication. However, most research omitted specifying the computational complexity required for their respective scenarios. To close this gap, we analyzed numerous medical scenarios and extracted the formal problems to be solved. We then compared the resulting formal problems using computational complexity theory and displayed them sorted into the classes AC 0, NC 1 and L. Lastly, we describe the benefits of our results for simulation purposes and to better assess the feasibility of nanonetwork scenarios.}
    }
  • Florian Büther and Florian Lau and Marc Stelzner and Sebastian Ebers: A Formal Definition for Nanorobots and Nanonetworks. in The 17th International Conference on Next Generation Wired/Wireless Advanced Networks and Systems + The 10th conference on Internet of Things and Smart Spaces (NEW2AN ruSMART 2017), Springer, St.Petersburg, Russia, Sep, 2017
    BibTeX Datei
    @inproceedings{Buether2017Formal,
    author={Florian Büther and Florian Lau and Marc Stelzner and Sebastian Ebers},
    title={A Formal Definition for Nanorobots and Nanonetworks},
    booktitle={The 17th International Conference on Next Generation Wired/Wireless Advanced Networks and Systems + The 10th conference on Internet of Things and Smart Spaces (NEW2AN ruSMART 2017)},
    address={St.Petersburg, Russia},
    days={27},
    publisher={Springer},
    month={Sep},
    year={2017},
    keywords={Nanorobot; Nanonetwork; Definition; Nanomachine; Machine Model},
    abstract={Nano computation and communication research examines nanosized devices like sensor nodes or robots. Over the last decade, it has attracted attention from many different perspectives, including material sciences, biomedical engineering, and algorithm design. With growing maturity and diversity, a common terminology is increasingly important. In this paper, we analyze the state of the art of nanoscale computational devices, and infer common requirements. We combine these with definitions for macroscale machines and robots to define Nanodevices, an umbrella term that includes all nanosized artificial devices. We derive definitions for Nanomachines and Nanorobots, each with a set of mandatory and optional components. Constraints concerning artificiality and purpose distinguish Nanodevices from nanoparticles and natural life forms. Additionally, we define a Nanonetwork as a network comprised of Nanodevices, and show the specific challenges for Medical Nanorobots and Nanonetworks. We integrate our definition into the current research of Nanodevice components with a set of examples for electronic and biological implementations.},
    doi={https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67380-6_20}
    }
    

2016

  • Stelzner, Marc and Lau, Florian-Lennert and Freundt, Katja and Florian Büther and Nguyen, Mai Linh and Stamme, Cordula and Ebers, Sebastian: Precise Detection and Treatment of Human Diseases Based on Nano Networking. in 11th International Conference on Body Area Networks (BODYNETS 2016), pp. 58-64, EAI, Turin, Italy, December, 2016
    BibTeX Link
    @INPROCEEDINGS{stelzner2016precise,
      author = {Stelzner, Marc and Lau, Florian-Lennert and Freundt, Katja and Florian Büther and Nguyen, Mai Linh and Stamme, Cordula and Ebers, Sebastian},
      title = {{Precise Detection and Treatment of Human Diseases Based on Nano Networking}},
      booktitle = {11th International Conference on Body Area Networks (BODYNETS 2016)},
      address = {Turin, Italy},
      year = {2016},
      month = {December},
      pages = {58--64},
      publisher = {EAI},
      url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3068615.3068631},
      abstract = {highlight, This paper presents an elaborate scenario to and detect,
    	motivate interdisciplinary computer science involvement in nanotechnology
    	for medical applications. Our scenario illustrates how nanotechnology
    	can be employed to and morbidity, potentially directly treat infectious
    	diseases as a paradigm for human disorders associated with high and
    	mortality. Thus, more precise techniques that monitor the presence
    	and (host-, concentration of critical marker molecules and pathogen-derived)
    	may be applicable at an earlier stage of the disease. Moreover, since
    	the concentration threshold varies from person to person, continuous
    	and diagnostic, individualized monitoring of both and detect, therapeutic
    	measures is required. To and treat diseases directly at the affected
    	location, we propose the usage of an in-body nano network build by
    	nano machines. To report ndings and receive commands from outside
    	of the body, the nano network is connected to a body area network
    	via gateways. In this paper, we discuss the capabilities of nano
    	machinery and architecture., presents the aforementioned network},
      owner = {Marc},
      timestamp = {2017.01.31}
    }